08-29-11

AT&T donates $10,000 to Northeast State

KINGSPORT - AT&T has announced a $10,000 contribution to Northeast State Community College to support students enrolled in the new accelerated pathways technical certificate and degree programs in Tennessee community colleges.

The AT&T Completion Scholarship Program will fund scholarships to help community college students statewide begin a path toward completing their college degrees. The contribution was presented today to Northeast State Community College at the Kingsport Center for Higher Education..

"Our state's community colleges serve as crucial pathways to prosperity for students who want to enter the job market as soon as possible," said Lieutenant Governor Ron Ramsey. "AT&T's commitment to good corporate citizenship in education will allow Tennessee's future workforce to reach its full potential reaping benefits for all Tennesseans.".

This donation is part of AT&T’s $130,000 gift to the Tennessee Board of Regents. Each of the Tennessee’s 13 community colleges will receive $10,000 to award scholarships to encourage students to participate in programs designed to help students succeed in the classroom and be better prepared to enter the workforce. The programs will target non-traditional and underserved students..

“The students at Northeast State who will receive these scholarships will have a better path toward completion of their degree,” said Dr. Janice Gilliam, President of Northeast State Community College. “We’re very grateful to AT&T for this gift, which will help our students succeed, both in the classroom and in their careers.”.

“Thanks to the leadership of Lieutenant Governor Ron Ramsey and other members of the Tennessee General Assembly, we are improving college completion rates,” said Miles Burdine, CEO of the Kingsport Chamber of Commerce. “Their foresight and dedication to education is making a real difference in our higher ed institutions, and scholarships like the one announced today would not be possible without their leadership.”.

In January 2010, the Tennessee legislature approved an aggressive set of steps to increase the completion rates of students within the institutions of higher education in the state..

“We are pleased to help these students at Northeast State,” said Alan Hill, Regional Director for AT&T. “It is our goal to ensure that students are fully prepared to enter the workforce and that they can find good jobs right here in Tennessee when they graduate.”.

The Tennessee Board of Regents’ Office of Academic Affairs developed a curriculum for accelerated pathways for college completion. The goal is to increase completion rates at the TBR community colleges. TBR created programs of study that encourage and allow students with work and family obligations to enroll on a full-time basis, devoting 20 to 30 hours a week, including online education. Students now have the option to complete required coursework for an Associate of Arts and Associate of Science degrees within three semesters..

Students in these new programs would benefit from scholarships that would enable them to participate fully in the four to five-hour morning, evening or weekend blocks of time required to complete an accelerated certificate or degree program. The proposed AT&T Completion Scholarship program ($10,000 to each of the 13 Tennessee Board of Regents’ community colleges) would allow the institutions to award financial support to students enrolled in these programs and increase completion and entry into the workforce in Tennessee..

For more information, contact:
Chris Walker
AT&T Public Affairs
Office: 615-214-6555
E-mail: chris.walker.3@att.com
 

08-23-11

AT&T donates $130,000 to Tennessee community colleges

NASHVILLE — AT&T today announced a $130,000 contribution to the Tennessee Board of Regents (TBR) to support students enrolled in the new accelerated pathways technical certificate and degree programs in Tennessee community colleges. The AT&T Completion Scholarship Program will fund scholarships to help community college students statewide begin a path toward completing their college degrees. The announcement was made at Nashville State Community College.

“We are pleased to help Tennessee students who are acquiring the skills they need to enter the workforce,” said Gregg Morton, President of AT&T Tennessee. “Accelerated certificate and degree programs are a great way to ensure our students are fully prepared to enter the workforce and that they can find good jobs right here in Tennessee when they graduate.”

“This generous donation to Tennessee’s community colleges will make a large impact in advancing public higher education in Tennessee,” said Chancellor John Morgan. “We’re very grateful to AT&T for helping us maintain our forward momentum. The initiatives this contribution will fund will directly enhance and promote our completion agenda."

Each of the state’s 13 community colleges will receive $10,000 to award scholarships to encourage students to participate in programs designed to help students succeed in the classroom and be better prepared to enter the workforce. The programs will target non-traditional and underserved students.

In January 2010, the Tennessee legislature approved an aggressive set of steps to increase the completion rates of students within the institutions of higher education in the state.

"Our state's community colleges serve as crucial pathways to prosperity for students who want to enter the job market as soon as possible," said Lieutenant Governor Ron Ramsey. "AT&T's commitment to good corporate citizenship in education will allow Tennessee's future workforce to reach its full potential reaping benefits for all Tennesseans."

“Success in higher education is very important for Tennessee’s long-term growth and potential,” said House Speaker Beth Harwell. “AT&T’s investment in programs like this exemplifies its commitment to furthering education in Tennessee.”

“AT&T’s commitment to education is something we need more companies throughout the state to follow,” said Sen. Dolores Gresham, chairman of the Senate Education Committee. “AT&T’s investment in programs like these with our state’s community colleges will strengthen Tennessee’s future economy and workforce.”

“The relationship between business and education is an important one for job creation in Tennessee,” said Rep. Richard Montgomery, chairman of the House Education Committee. “Statistics continue to show that the jobs of the future will require some type of secondary education, and helping our students in obtaining degrees and certificates will lead to more job growth and development for Tennessee.”

The Tennessee Board of Regents’ Office of Academic Affairs developed a curriculum for accelerated pathways for college completion. The goal is to increase completion rates at the TBR community colleges. TBR created programs of study that encourage and allow students with work and family obligations to enroll on a full-time basis, devoting 20 to 30 hours a week, including online education. Students now have the option to complete required coursework for an Associate of Arts and Associate of Science degrees within three semesters.

Students in these new programs would benefit from scholarships that would enable them to participate fully in the four to five-hour morning, evening or weekend blocks of time required to complete an accelerated certificate or degree program. The proposed AT&T Completion Scholarship program ($10,000 to each of the 13 Tennessee Board of Regents’ community colleges) would allow the institutions to award financial support to students enrolled in these programs and increase completion and entry into the workforce in Tennessee.

For more information, contact:
Chris Walker
AT&T Public Affairs
Office: 615-214-6555
E-mail: chris.walker.3@att.com
 

08-23-11
 

Northeast continues to make progress on RCAP building

Northeast State continues to make progress on the Pal Barger Regional Center for Automotives Program facility. The building – located in downtown Kingsport – formerly housed the Free Service Tire Company. Northeast State Foundation purchased the building with a $400,000 donation from Kingsport executive Pal Barger.

The College has completed exterior painting and installation of garage doors and exterior signage. Currently, asbestos abatement has been completed and Northeast State plant operations workers are installing sheetrock. Northeast State is currently in process of obtaining a building permit to start construction on interior classrooms and offices.

The center will house the auto body service technology certificate program, which will train students how to repair and rebuild auto bodies involved in accidents and collisions. Students will receive state-of-the-art training in areas such as welding, metal fabrication, refinishing, auto painting, and repair estimation.

Northeast State is now taking applications for students interested in the new Auto Body Service Technology certificate program offered at Northeast State at Kingsport beginning fall 2011. Potential students interested in admission to the Auto Body Service Technology certificate may contact the Office of Admissions and Records at 800.836.7822 or e-mail admissions@NortheastState.edu.

08-23-11

Northeast State's virtual painter is eco-friendly and fun

A Northeast State student stands before a small, waist-high rectangular box. Wearing what looks like a welding helmet and wielding a hand-held device, the student makes sweeping motions in front of the box while an image changes color on a nearby computer screen. In a moment, the student lifts the visor, checks the screen, and views the quality of the work.

The student is learning to paint and coat vehicles on the College's virtual painter, the newest addition to Northeast State's automotive body service technology program. The eco-friendly painter produces a realistic setting that allow students to practice techniques and muscle and joint movements that produce ideal paint coverage and thickness on a finished vehicle surface.

"It really allows for immediate feedback and decreases training time," said Ernie Morelock, instructor of Automotive Service Technology at Northeast State. "With a glance, students can tell how well they did and then get right back to work on refining their techniques."

With traditional training, students must select, move, and mount a part before painting. They must also choose nozzles, retrieve paint, and don protective gear before starting. With the virtual painter, the student logs in and chooses his equipment, paint, and auto body surface in a matter of seconds.

After painting a hood, fender, or other part, the students and instructors may view the work from 360 degrees, inspect defects, and evaluate paint coverage, thickness, and amount used. For another practice session, just few taps on a touch screen monitor get the student back to work.

"There's no doubt this means more hand-on practice time and student will learn to become better painters in a shorter period of time," said Morelock. "It's a great way to learn and it's fun."

The virtual painter a boon for training, making training less expensive and more environmentally friendly. There is no need for vehicle parts, overspray and waste is simulated, parts do not require cleaning with chemicals, and no volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are released.

"Sustainability is a big part of the recent Complete College Tennessee Act of 2010," said Northeast State President Dr. Janice Gilliam. "The virtual painter is a perfect example of how you can achieve excellent training results, and reduce costs and environmental impact."

VRSim of East Hartford, Conn. manufactures the virtual painter – known as a SimSpray™. According to company literature, the technology is a combination gaming programming, coupled with state-of-the-art tracking systems, and graphics rendering.

For more information, contact Bob Carpenter at rccarpenter@NortheastState.edu or 423.323.0259.

08-22-11

UT, TBR Announce 50 Guaranteed Transfer Pathways between Community Colleges and Universities

NASHVILLE - Community college students who want to complete a bachelor's degree now have a guarantee that their credits will transfer to a public university in Tennessee, if they choose one of 50 different majors offering transfer pathways.

The University of Tennessee (UT) and Tennessee Board of Regents TBR) systems have collaborated to create 50 "Tennessee Transfer Pathways" for timely and cost-effective transitioning from a two- to four-year degree. All pathways are effective for the fall 2011 semester.

Every student entering a community college in Tennessee now can select one of 50 majors with accompanying transfer pathways, complete required courses, earn an associate's degree and transition seamlessly as a junior at a Tennessee public university. All earned credit hours will apply toward a bachelor's degree in the same discipline.

If followed exactly, the pathways also guarantee admission to all public universities in the state, except for UT Knoxville. The Complete College Tennessee Act of 2010, which outlined the transfer pathway model, requires that admission to UT Knoxville "remain competitive."

"This is among the single-most important achievements in recent years to increase the number of Tennesseans with four-year degrees," UT President Joe DiPietro said. "We were involved every step of the way in creation of the Complete College legislation and are confident in its potential to significantly enhance the state's workforce and attract new business to Tennessee."

"This program highlights the successful collaboration among all of our universities and community colleges," said TBR Chancellor John Morgan. "It helps students achieve their goals and complete their degrees, but it also helps them do it in a more efficient and less expensive way, without sacrificing the quality of our academic programs."

The 50 pathways were chosen based on transfer data. They include programs such as business administration, engineering, nursing, agriculture and criminal justice, among many others. A complete listing is available at: www.tntransferpathway.org.

Schools participating in the transfer pathways program include TBR's 13 community colleges and six universities and UT's three undergraduate campuses in Chattanooga, Knoxville and Martin. Not all schools have the demand or resources needed to offer all 50 pathways, but advisors are being trained to identify the best options for students interested in pursuing a bachelor's degree. A listing of schools and pathways offered is included on the above-referenced Web site.

"More than 450 UT and TBR faculty members worked together over the past year to make today's announcement possible," said UT Interim Vice President for Academic Affairs and Student Success Katie High.

"We faced a challenge with an aggressive timeline, but the pathways have the potential to positively impact more than 4,500 students transferring from our public community colleges to universities each year," she said.

Each pathway outlines approximately 41 general education credit hours and 19 hours of prerequisites necessary for transfer.

To ensure transfer, pathways must be followed exactly, and substitutions will not be accepted. Students who change pathways or majors are not guaranteed all courses will apply.

"The implementation of the transfer pathways is a giant step forward in creating a seamless process for earning a college degree for the citizens of Tennessee," said TBR Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs Paula Short. "We will be tracking the progress of our students and will work to constantly improve the process so that students receive the maximum benefit."

Outreach efforts are planned to ensure ongoing communication with current and prospective students, high school guidance counselors, parents and community members.

More information is available for download and distribution on the transfer pathways website, www.tntransferpath.org.

Creation of the transfer pathways website was aided by grant funding from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

UT Media Contacts
Gina Stafford, 865.974.0741, stafford@tennessee.edu 
Ellie Amador, 865.974.1177, amador@tennessee.edu 

TBR Media Contact 
Monica Greppin, 615.366.4417, monica.greppin@tbr.edu 

Additional Interviewees
Faculty representatives from both UT and TBR are available upon request.

08-23-11

Andy Davis performs Sept. 14 at Northeast State

Nashville-based singer & songwriter Andy Davis brings his blue-eyed soul music to Northeast State Community College next month with a free concert at the Wellmont Regional Center for the Performing Arts.

A contemporary artist raised on old-school rock and soul, Davis's ear for hooks and the often irregular heartbeat of human relationships. His first album, Thinks of Her, struck a chord on college radio, selling out its initial print run. The original pressing of the CD - with Davis's hand-written lyrics and stenciled cover art - became a collector's item within months of its release.

In 2005, the re-mastered rerelease of Thinks of Her gained Davis national exposure and brought him to the attention of legendary music producer Mitchell Froom (Paul McCartney, Sheryl Crow, Elvis Costello). The result of their collaboration was Let the Woman a sophisticated, sonically adventurous album. Barnes and Noble won the rights to distribute Let the Woman online and in their stores all over the world. The album's single, Brown Eyes, became a staple on Adult Alternative radio, and the album reached #4 on the Adult Alternative chart.

He toured extensively headlining and opening for Colbie Caillat, Jakob Dylan, Mat Kearney, and NEEDTOBREATHE. Davis later became a prominent member of Ten Out of Tenn, a critically acclaimed collective of Nashville singer/songwriters who joined forces for a collaborative tour that was documented in the award-winning documentary film, Any Day Now.

Davis returned to Nashville in 2009 to record New History, which was featured in – and inspired – an episode of ABC's Grey's Anatomy. He returned to the scene in February when he raised over $41,000 strictly from fans in just 30 days through a Kickstarter campaign to record his new album. He is currently in the studio working to finish the new record due this fall.

Davis takes the stage at 7 p.m. The concert is free and open to the public. For more information, visit www.andydavisonline.com or contact 423.354.2474 or keglover@NortheastState.edu.

08-22-11

Northeast State opens new parking area on main campus

Student parking, or lack thereof, can create havoc on a college campus especially during the first frantic days of a semester

. To alleviate crowded lots and frustrated drivers, Northeast State Community College created a new overflow parking area on the main campus at Blountville just in time for the fall semester.

"The new lot provides more flexibility for students to get parking spots without circling the campus and being late for class," said Pete Miller, director of Maintenance Operations at Northeast State. "We expect overflow every fall so we hope this new lot can reduce the frustration for students."

The 74,000-square-foot space located at the east end of campus can accommodate up to 200 vehicles. Students can take the main entrance from Highway 75 and bear right approximately 300 yards to the first stop sign. From there, a right turn onto Holston Private Drive and an immediate left turn onto Aviation Drive bring the student to the parking lot's entrance.

The lot was constructed on the former site where archery and marksmanship classes were held under the physical education program. Those classes were moved to a different location on campus. Parking space also opens up near Northeast State at Kingsport this fall. The city of Kingsport completed construction of a parking facility in downtown earlier this year.

Officers from the Northeast State Police and Safety Office will be directing traffic flow on the main campus during the first week of fall semester. Students should pick up their parking permits when registering or paying fees before the first day of fall classes on Monday, Aug. 29.

Students can learn more about Northeast State at Blountville via this interactive campus map that features an overview of the campus grounds and photographs of the academic and administration buildings.